Management

Inspired Workers

August 30, 2012

There is a trend with my posts about software design where I write a lot about how it is a creative process. This is largely because for years, software design was considered to be busy work, and I take extreme issue with that philosophy. I find producing consistently effective software designs to be a very difficult task, and I deeply respect those who are good at it. I also find that those who are good at it have in common that they are all inspired workers.

When Ambushed For An Estimate

August 23, 2012

Held captive in a status meeting, your moment of shame approaches. Vulnerable and exposed, like a naked baby laid before encroaching doom, you await your turn. Your peers’ bold claims, naive honesty, and feeble excuses are recorded for posterity by a stone faced facilitator. They work their way around the room, thinly masking disdain at any answer that is not a crisply delivered “I’m done”. Finally, the time of judgement is upon you. As you fumble to explain your lack of completion, you are interrupted by a question that has struck down even the strongest among us: “When will you be done?” Fighting back a swelling tide of emotion, you try desperately to think of what you can say that you haven’t already. Step aside my child, let me handle this.

A Dangerous Corollary

August 21, 2012

One of the most difficult challenges I face in my professional life is is maintaining a healthy working relationship with people who I believe are deeply incompetent. Incompetency is, for me, extremely difficult to stomach — far more difficult than, say, laziness or apathy, because whereas those might point to an attitude problem, incompetency reveals that the basic skills necessary to effectively perform daily tasks are missing. To further exacerbate the issue, one of my [many] personal character flaws is that I find it extremely difficult to relate to or to support someone I do not respect. Because of this, I’ve not only become acutely aware of the truth behind the Peter Principle, but I’ve also picked up on an even more dangerous corollary that’s become more and more prevalent in the workplace. For the sake of discussion, I’ll refer to it as the Napier Principle.

Work More Hours

August 14, 2012

If you’re a senior-or-above talent, you know how work longer hours without it significantly impacting your work product. For this, I’m talking about the 40-50 hour range. Most people start to fall off around the 50-60 hour range, and we all start producing crap around 60-80 hours. Beyond 80 hours, it probably time to look for a new job. Having said this, let’s focus on the 40-50 hour range. If your employer suggests or requires that you work these extra hours, it’s probably not going to destroy your home life, or wreck your sense of well-being, so the impact should be minimal, if not negligible. Why not work these extra hours? Because you’re not getting paid for them.

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